What Is the Minimum Wage in Connecticut?

Nicolas Cesare  | 

2019 Minimum Wage in Connecticut: $10.10 per hour

The current minimum wage in the state of Connecticut is $10.10 per hour of work. This is higher than the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. In cases where state law requires a higher wage than the federal minimum, the state’s rules take priority. Connecticut’s current minimum wage of $10.10 per hour is the result of a slow ramping up of the wage floor, which steadily increased from $8.00 an hour in 2009 to the current rate starting in 2017.

The minimum wage in Connecticut only applies to non-exempt hourly employees. Employees who aren’t covered by minimum wage laws in Connecticut include:

  • People who work at camps or resorts which are open for no more than six months out of the year;
  • People engaged in domestic service for a private home, except where otherwise specified by the Fair Labor Standards Act;
  • People employed as executives or administrators.;
  • People who volunteer for educational, charitable, religious, scientific, historical, literary, or non-profit purposes;
  • Members of the armed forces, who are subject to regular military wages.

Tipped: $6.38 to $8.23 per hour

Employers in the state of Connecticut can claim a tip credit, if employees are expected to make enough money in tips doing their regular job that the tip credit will not interfere with their ability to meet the minimum wage. For restaurant and hotel staff, employers can claim a tip credit of $3.72 an hour, allowing them to pay tipped staff $6.38 an hour. Meanwhile, bartenders have a minimum wage of $8.23 an hour, allowing their employees to take a $1.87 tip credit.

Weekly: $404

A minimum wage employee working 40 hours per week could expect to earn $404 per week. However, this amount does not include federal or state taxes or payroll deductions such as 401k contributions or health insurance premiums.

Annually: $21,008

A minimum wage employee working full-time for a full year with paid federal holidays could expect to make $21,008 a year. Once again, this amount does not include deductions from an employee’s paycheck, such as taxes, retirement contributions, or health insurance premiums.

Overtime: $14.40 per hour

Non-exempt employees who work more than 40 hours a week at a single job are eligible for overtime pay. In Connecticut, overtime pay is calculated at one-and-a-half times an employee’s regular hourly wage. The minimum amount that an employee can be paid for overtime work is $14.40 per hour.

Minors: $8.59 per hour

Minors — or people working under the age of 18 — in the state of Connecticut are only entitled to 85 percent of the current minimum wage for the first 200 hours of employment in a given industry. 85 percent of $10.10 is $8.59 per hour.

Connecticut Minimum Wage Increase News

During its 2019 session, the Connecticut House of Representatives and the Senate passed a bill that will slowly increase the Connecticut minimum wage to $15 an hour by October of 2023. The state’s governor has promised to sign the bill, which will increase the minimum hourly wage to $11 in October of 2019; $12 by September 1st, 2020; $13, by August 1st, 2021; $14 by July 1st, 2022; and $15 by October 15th, 2023.

This bill is just one in a larger movement where many states and cities are considering a $15 minimum wage. Advocates argue that a minimum wage of $15 per hour is necessary for the minimum wage to be a living wage in many states. On the other hand, critics of a $15 minimum wage complain that such a proposition would lead to fewer jobs and stifle job growth.

No matter what the minimum wage in Connecticut becomes, remember that it is only a starting point. Many companies will pay more than minimum wage in order to bring the best employees in to work for them. If you prove yourself at a job that you’ve held for some time, you can also ask for a raise to make more money.


Image Source: https://depositphotos.com/

Nick Cesare is a writer from Boise, ID. In his free time he enjoys rock climbing and making avocado toast.

This post was updated July 15, 2019. It was originally published July 15, 2019.